Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Bobcats and full moon


  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 Jason Carruth

Jason Carruth

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 140 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cortez, Co
  • Interests:Hunting anything especially predators. Learning as much about my quarry as possible. Hunting coyotes with my 2 Mtn. cur decoy dogs.

Posted 29 March 2009 - 03:58 PM

Hello everyone! This is my first post here. I love the format and the tons of interesting info I have read already. I saw a different post about predator response during a full moon and it got me looking over my notes from this past season. I called 9 cats ,partner 1 called 4 cats, and partner 2 called 5 cats. Of these 6 were called at night on 1/2 or less moon. Of the day called cats 8 were called between 10am and 3pm with the moon at 1/4 or less(7 of the 8 were called with 1/8 or less moon). The remaining 5 cats were called at the traditional early morning(up to 8am) and late evening(last hour of shooting light) all over the moon phase. Of possible interest 3 of these cats responded in less than 7min, indicating the cats were close by. My theory that I am working on is that on days of little to no moon light cats are more active during mid day. I realize cats have excellent night vision but could it be that they are not as succesful hunters on the darkest nights of the moon phase? Maybe prey species are not as active on low light nights giving fewer chances for encounters? This is the first year I kept detailed cat records to try to increase my cat take and is hardly scientific. Has anyone else seen similarities or differences? Of 22 night hunting nights full or bright moon nights were the least productive on coyotes and cats. Grey and red fox to a lesser extent, seemed less affected by moon phase and seemed the easiest to call and quickest to respond. Of note grey fox can not be taken in Colorado and all got a pass. Any insight would be interesting.

#2 Steve Craig

Steve Craig

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 271 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 12 April 2009 - 09:39 AM

There are far too many variables to say one way or the other. I have called a pile of cats over the years. Light appears in many different "frequencies", or spectrums that you and i simply can not see. So much so that you and I simply can not say one way or the other. It could be either the presence of certain light frequencies or a lack of them.
I do know, and this is a great "hand rule", if you will; that if you are not calling cats in the morning hours, do not leave the field or stop calling between the 10 and 3 hours of the day. Some of your finest calling will be at that time.
My own records show, 30+ years worth, that I have called far more bobcats at 2-2:30 PM that at any other time of day. A full 3 to 1 ratio over mornings and evenings.
But alot of this has to do with HOW I hunt bobcats too.
Moon phases simply do not enter into my hunting. Never has. Go hunting when you have the chance is my motto.
FWIW
Steve

#3 Jason Carruth

Jason Carruth

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 140 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cortez, Co
  • Interests:Hunting anything especially predators. Learning as much about my quarry as possible. Hunting coyotes with my 2 Mtn. cur decoy dogs.

Posted 13 April 2009 - 08:57 AM

So I am reading to much into the moon? I can buy that. You call alot of cats between 2-2:30pm? What, if you are willing to share, is the way you are calling bobcats? When I target cats I start by calling areas I have found plenty of sign, then use the higher pitch busier sounds, at a moderate level for 15-20 min. I try to use some kind of decoy if terrain allows and I look for stand locations that have "edges" where two or prefferably more types of terrian meet. Everyones advice seems to be to stay longer. All the couple dozen cats I have killed have been less than 15min. Both of my hunting buddies killed all their cats in under 15min accept one cat @ 23min. Do you stay on stand longer as a rule? I am using myself and hunting partners exerperinces as I find first hand info is how I learn best. I would appreciate your input as I have read alot of the "internet expert" stuff that gets repeated on other boards. Thanks

#4 Steve Craig

Steve Craig

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 271 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 13 April 2009 - 11:20 AM

Time on stand depends on your terrain and time of day. In an area of real heavy think brush, you are far better off to call for 10 to 12 minutes and move a short distance and call again. In more open type terrain, I call 30 minutes minimum, and move a mile or so. You and I MUST remember that cats hunt there way to the caller, for the most part.
One of the reasons I call so many cats in the late afternoon is I am calling to them in their bedroom. You and I have to go to them later in the day. Get in the areas they are bedding down in and spend 30 minutes or more calling in open terrain. And your 10 to 12 in the heavy brush.
I have called several bobcats that I saw bedded down and it took over 2 hours before he would get up and come in, but they all came in after they decided to get up.
Cats are simply independant suckers! They do things on their time.......not ours. Lions too.

You are wise to call where you see alot of sign. You cant call them where they aint! But some cat habitats will show very little if any sign, yet will look "catty". I have called a pile of cats out of such stuff. I have seen areas where there were 1 to 3 Toms working their territories and six weeks later all gone for 2-3 months them full of cats again.
Variables...........just too many for us to completely understand.

I do not believe there are any "experts", and dont consider myself one. There is simply far too much to learn. Too much more to get to understand. My favorite quote is from a man I consider one of the wisest men I have ever known. He said." the more I learn, the more I see there is to learn". The more I have learned about lions, for instance, the more I know and see I am never going to learn all there is to know about them in this life. You and I can always get better and better in our interpretation of the quarry we are trying to kill or catch.
This is a great mystery that few understand. We can always get better. And interpreting what we see is our teacher. Sometimes our interpretation may be "off", but if we have an open mind, and we are "teachable" and dont get to the place where we think we know it all(internet experts) we will continue to learn more and more as our interpretation of a hunting or fishing situation gets better and better.

So to answer your first question.........no i do not think you are reading too much into the moon. I simply believe that more time under many, many situations is needed before you or i can make a final statement that the moon controls movement, activity, etc. Stay with it. Keep it in the back of your mind, if you will.

If I had to make a guess about the moon and movements(from my own interpretations of the situation), I would say that I find the first and third quarters, and 2 or 3 days on each side of them, provide the best hunting(daytime) for me.
I have also observed that prey movements are really up at this time as well.
These are my own interpretations and my own findings up to this point in time, in my own areas of AZ.
I have also found this to be true of Raccoon movement in Indiana as well.

Use this info as an aide only. See if it works that way in your area. It may or may not. But if you and I keep this info as an aide, we will not go off into some other world of this is the way it is type deal, and we will continue to get better and better as we begin to put it all together.

Sorry to carry on so long.
Keep learning,
Steve

#5 Jason Carruth

Jason Carruth

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 140 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cortez, Co
  • Interests:Hunting anything especially predators. Learning as much about my quarry as possible. Hunting coyotes with my 2 Mtn. cur decoy dogs.

Posted 13 April 2009 - 01:25 PM

Thanks for answering Steve. Cats unlike coyotes seem to provide me with fewer lessons in their behavior than I'd like every season :) . Have you or anyone else noticed if sound volume makes a difference in male to female call in ratios?

#6 Steve Craig

Steve Craig

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 271 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 13 April 2009 - 03:23 PM

Volume......I have only one when calling cats. L O U D!!!!! Especially lions. If they can here it, they will come.

Take this to the bank. With a WT caller, I will call on the #5 setting on a still day. On a windy day, Max at #6 setting!

This is a huge mistake most feline callers will make. They dont call loud enough. Target cats.....call L O U D!

Many is the time I have been watching an area, only to look at the speaker and there is a bobcat with his nose in it at full volume. It doesnt "scare" them. If fact, I really believe it is an aide. They cant resist. Curiousity. We all know what happens to a cat that is curious!

Decoys area great aide as well.

#7 Okanagan

Okanagan

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 219 posts

Posted 13 April 2009 - 07:12 PM

Thanks for the info, Steve. FWIW, I have a thimble of cat knoweledge compared to you, but I've called way the most of my bobcats in mid afternoon. Never kept exact records but would have guessed 3:00 pm.

I've never done night calling for anything except for a few times when I knew an animal was near and wanted to experiment or call it to where I could see it.

#8 Jason Carruth

Jason Carruth

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 140 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cortez, Co
  • Interests:Hunting anything especially predators. Learning as much about my quarry as possible. Hunting coyotes with my 2 Mtn. cur decoy dogs.

Posted 14 April 2009 - 07:30 AM

Thanks Steve. You have given me something to think about.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users