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Jim Arthur

Arizona Gets Night Hunting

23 posts in this topic

Jim your link takes us through Facebook before landing at AZG&F. I fixed it.

This is really about making money for the department more than anything else. Increasing their big game species populations enables more permits to be sold. They already stagger hunts in many units to cycle in and out big game hunters so as to get the most money possible.

I also think the addition of lion hunting at night cheapens the experience. I feel the same way about using dogs to tree them, then shooting them.

No progress on shooting lions with shot and that was what we really pushed for in the predator hunting clubs these last 5 years. Does it benefit the department? Minimally so it was not even considered I would imagine.

In the end I guess we should be happy as this is stage 1 of what Ron Day said to us would be a multistage unfolding of night hunting in the state. Next step in a few years would be to broaden the units where it is permissible.

FYI- I will get an AZG&F rep (probably Ron Day) to come to an APC meeting in the near future to explain to us in detail this new ruling.

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"PHOENIX - Arizona Sen. Frank Antenori wants you to be able to hunt varmints at night.

And he wants you to be able to stalk that prey, and more, in cities.

The Tucson Republican said he is not talking about some new form of urban hunting. Instead, his proposals, in two separate measures, are designed to deal with what he said are shortcomings in Arizona hunting laws.

First is the issue of night hunting.

Existing law limits hunting to daylight hours. HB 1335, titled "hunting at night, varmints," would create an exception for jackrabbits, raccoons and other "predatory animals."

"They're mostly nocturnal," he said. "So the likelihood of success in hunting them increases if you hunt them at night."

Antenori is particularly interested in providing new opportunities to hunt coyotes, which he said are taking their toll on deer and antelope, particularly the young ones in May, June and July.

"You do need to hunt them and keep that population sort of suppressed for that short period of time," he said.

Antenori said he doesn't want people just wandering around at night, firing into the dark.

He wants some safeguards, such as a requirement to scope out the area before it gets dark to ensure there are no occupied structures nearby. Antenori said he also believes hunters need to have some lights to be able to see their targets.

Antenori also said he does not want to allow night hunting during "big game season."

"The Game and Fish guys don't want anybody out there shooting an elk and then claiming they shot them during the daytime but using the cover if they get caught at night of saying that they were out there hunting coyotes," he said.

He acknowledged that his legislation contains nothing to preclude that from happening. Antenori said that may require amending the measure, either to put that into law or, at least, giving the state Game and Fish Commission the power to enact some regulations.

His other hunting measure, HB 1334, would take away the right of cities to ban hunting within their limits.

Antenori said he's not proposing to let hunters go shooting in urbanized areas. Instead, he said the legislation is aimed at the issue of cities incorporating vast tracts of undeveloped state-owned property into their limits.

"Land that had usually been accessible and available for hunting has been annexed by cities," he said.

For example, Antenori said, Tucson has added large tracts of land to the east out to Vail. And Peoria has annexed property on its northern edge past Lake Pleasant.

"There have not been any structural changes," Antenori said, with the property still remaining unoccupied.

But he said current law and regulations allow the police chief to determine if an incorporated area is safe to hunt and, unilaterally, ban the practice.

Antenori said nothing in either bill would overrule existing regulations and laws, which preclude hunting within one-quarter mile of an occupied structure."

Everyone will have their own opinion about these new regulations, my opinion is we were sold out by the game commission as usual, they cater to the greenies and not to the sportsman who paid the bills. This is not what we were promised if the senator would hold this bill and let game and Fish regulate the night hunting and Arizona. This is nothing more than lip service. I for one am very dissatisfied with what game and Fish has done.

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"He wants some safeguards, such as a requirement to scope out the area before it gets dark to ensure there are no occupied structures nearby. Antenori said he also believes hunters need to have some lights to be able to see their targets."

Apparently this guy has never been out hunting at night. It's waaaay easier to see an occupied building AT NIGHT than it is in the day. You should not have to prescout an area for buildings. That right there shows their ignorance. 99% of the time a house is lit up at night. During the day you can't see a house 500 yards away through the trees or brush, at night you can see lights in a house or around the house. I've been out to places before suing the day and went back on another night and was amazed that there was a house less than 200 yards from where I was. Couldn't see the place during the day but sure as hell saw the lights around it at night. Being out there at night gives you a new perspective.

"Antenori also said he does not want to allow night hunting during "big game season."

"The Game and Fish guys don't want anybody out there shooting an elk and then claiming they shot them during the daytime but using the cover if they get caught at night of saying that they were out there hunting coyotes," he said."

Why no night hunting during big game season? Poachers are gonna poach day or night. A poacher can't currently go out and shoot an elk during the day and say he was hunting coyotes? It's ass backwards. More people out at night hunting at all times means more eyes and ears to squelch poaching.

If you are dissatisfied with the rules and regs, don't go hunt at night. Beggars can't be choosers and the all or nothing attitude will, more often than not, get you nothing in the long run. Some of the regs that were mentioned are ridiculous but ya gotta crawl before you can walk and you guys are making small steps toward bigger and better things.

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I for one think its great that you can hunt cats at night and better yet if you can hunt them with dogs. I for one would prefer to call them during the day but I saw what happened in OR when hunters didnt stick together on this subject. We have much less game than we did before the voters passed a ban on the use of dogs to hunt cougar. Many of those voters were hunters who didnt hunt with dogs themselves so they voted for the ban. What ever the reason for increasing big game numbers is I'm for it, even if I dont hunt them as much as I used to. We need to stick together the cougars are doing to the hunting in OR what the bunny huggers want, they are reducing the numbers of hunters.

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April May and June!!!!!! LOL!

States like Indiana has had night hunting forever, and no problems with poaching, shooting buildings, locating houses, etc. And you can use as big a caliber as you want!

Like I always say, you cant tell someone that dont know, they dont know!

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The biggest obstacle for night hunting in Arizona, is absolutely the Arizona Game and Fish Department. They have fought and won this battle for years. Just because Arizona game and Fish deals in game conservation they seem to get a free ride from the hunters. The conservation officers are totally against night hunting. Their concern about poaching and safety is nothing more than a smokescreen, they are afraid that they might have to get off their lazy ass and go check out something because they have a call from a concerned citizen. Arizona is one of the safest places for poachers simply because there are no eyes out and about in the dark.

I personally think the original bill should be reintroduced in the state Senate, get it passed and force game and Fish to do with the majority of predators in the state want. We pay the bills here.

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Question- With state budgets slashed across the gambit of departments, does allowing niught hunting mean they need to put more agents on the ground in those areas patrolling at night?

Just thinking what F&G will say the problem is.

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There is no reason to have any more or any less officers out in the field. If it is now LAWFUL to be out at night hunting predators, why would they need MORE officers? They would be over reacting if they thought they needed more people in the field.

If there's a rash of burglaries, murders or bank robberies do they hire more police officers?

You guys will double as border patrol agents.

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Uh yes. New police officers being hired is a direct result of higher crime rates. It's one of many methods of controlling crime. More officers paroling the streets.

Actually my thinking was more along the lines of....

Game and Fish purposely patrol areas where there are groups of hunters such as when deer season begins in a certain area. It stands to reason that they will find more infractions of the G&F regulations hanging around a group of deer hunters in Unit 10 than sitting in their trucks by Bank One Ball Park in Phx. If there are hunters hunting at night it would make sense that there needs to be someone on duty to handle a problem should one arise or to check everyone is following regulations. State agencies are stretched thin already. They can either make people work additional hours or hire new people. Both of which costs the state more money. Money we don't currently have.

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I'm talking about 2 bank robberies and 3 burglaries over the course of a year not raising the crime rate 30%. If there is a break in and a murder on Tuesday do they hire 2 more officers on Wednesday? Unlikely.

Their current quitting time is dark? If you have the same number of people working in a 24 hour period, why would you need any more on duty just because they allow hunting at night? If they have one guy that answers 4 calls a night, he may have to answer eight. Them's the breaks and it's their JOB, so do it.

You guys just need to let them know that YOU will be their eyes and ears. Let them know that more people/ hunters in the field means less poaching.

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As I initially said. Night hunting will probably require more officers to regulate it. That is a problem in the current economic climate.

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As I initially said. Night hunting will probably require more officers to regulate it. That is a problem in the current economic climate.

It should NOT require MORE officers! With you promoting that misguided mindset and nonsensical argument,you will be fighting an uphill battle. Tell them, CONVICE THEM, that there is no NEED for more officers.

Go look at other states that have recently allowed night hunting and see how many new officers they've had to hire.

So, since I'm not an Arizona resident and 41 other states with bad budgets allow night hunting and deal with it, I'll sit back and watch you guys flounder.

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With the increase of night hunting in the state is there no need for any additional G&F agents to patrol, and handle problems in the field than before? I would think so. You just doubled the hours people are allowed to hunt in the state (from 12 to 24 hours), adding a method of hunting which nobody here as any experience doing, and a whole new set of rules and regulations we've never had to follow as hunters or enforce as agents.

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This might be a question for Ron Day. We currently have night hunting for coon how is this handled do they patrol or wait for a phone call to bring thtem out. As a hunter i may make a call on a poacher but I surely would leave it at that.

Im sure they are now set up to handle enforcement at night as they have always been.Ther are a lot of questions. maybe Ron could shed some light.

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All the DNR has to do is change some of the shifts of it officers, they don't need to hire more help unless it becomes a problem and there is a increase in poaching. Here at home the deputy sheriff's also help with the nite calls and if a follow up is needed then the DNR will send someone. Also as the season changes the DNR's officers work schedule changes to when and where the activaty is the highest. Example deer season just ended here and alot of ice fishermen are takeing to the lakes from noon till dark and some time after so the DNR makes its rounds in this time frame ....

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I cannot see where there will be a need for more officers in the field. According to the news release this to be a very limited area and very limited access. And one other part of this joke that nobody brought up is that they propose to use white lights and shotguns for coyotes. What a circle jerk of idiots.

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Dan, one of the G&F officials who was instrumental in getting this passed tells me that the issue of night hunting has been rejected out of hand everytime it has been brought to the table in the past.

He considers this to be a victory, but just a foot in the door... a good beginning.

Changes and additions to the regulations will be incremental until we enjoy the same privileges that other states do.

This will be contingent on compliance by hunters. If a number are ticketed for accidentally shooting anything other than coyotes or lions ( mistaking approaching fox or bobcats) it will cause problems for the effort to include rifles and increase the number of hunt units .

Education, especially target identification at night, will be key.

I'm going to ask Gary to give a seminar on night hunting to the combined clubs, and the public at large, in March.

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Obviously the state official you're referring to is probably one of the officials that promised Arizona Sen. Frank Antenori if he would pull house bill 1335 they would implement night hunting. However in the original bill it was about hunting predators and varmints at night, that would include all non-furbearing animals.

What Arizona game and Fish has approved so far is shotgun only, coyote only, on mountain lion, night hunting in very specific areas and very specific times.

Arizona is attempting to use the resident sportsmen to control predators so as to increase game animal numbers. Game and Fish has yet to address the real issue, that is nice hunting in the state of Arizona not in some chickenshit little area of the state.

Arizona Sen. Frank Antenori's telephone number is 602-926-5683. He is very interested in the opinions of Arizona hunters, please give him a call and tell him you feel we were not given what they promised.

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This is the area G&F wants you to travel to, if you want to hunt coyotes with a shotgun at night.

CLEANING137.jpg

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What about lions? Are the areas different?

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Lion is completely different and way less restrictions.

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